Join our mailing list for updates, events, and recipes 

Produce Info and Storage Guide

Use this handy guide to learn more about the items you receive in your produce share. We also include storage tips to lengthen the life of your fruits and vegetables!

Alliums

Leeks are a related to onions but have a more mild onion flavor than onions or scallions. Store your leeks in a breathable bag in the high-humidity drawer of the refrigerator. If your leeks start to look wilted or dried out, peel off brown or dried outer layers to reveal fresh layers that are still fine to use and eat! Leeks can be frozen for later use - they will lose their crisp texture but will retain their flavor in the freezer.

 

Scallions - also called green onions - are used to add a mild onion flavor to recipes and are often used as a topping on soups, fried rice, and more. Scallions should be stored in a breathable bag in the high-humidity drawer of the refrigerator. If your scallions begin to look wilted or dried out, peel off brown or dry outer layers to reveal fresh layers underneath. Scallions can be frozen for later use; they will lose their crisp texture but will retain their flavor in the freezer.

 

Green garlic is the young garlic plant that is harvested before the bulb fully forms. Store your green garlic in the fridge just like you would your scallions - in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer. You can use the entire plant - stem, immature bulb, and all - in recipes. Green garlic has a milder taste than mature garlic and is great in stir fries and pesto, but you can also use green garlic in place of regular garlic in any recipe.

 

Onions should be stored in a cool, dark, well-ventilated space in the pantry. Unlike scallions and leeks, your onions have been cured leaving them with a thicker skin which will allow them to last several months in ideal conditions. Partially used onions should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Onions that are sprouting green tops are still safe to eat - simply remove the green sprouts and peel as usual. You can even use the green sprouts as you would green onions. Make sure to store your onions away from your potatoes as the onions will cause the potatoes to sprout faster than usual.

 

Fruits and Seeds

Store your strawberries on the counter if you plan on eating them within the day or in the fridge you want to keep them for a little longer. Unlike the strawberries you get from the grocery store, our berries are picked at peak ripeness and therefore will not last very long. Eat them quickly or wash and freeze them whole for later use.

 

Freshly picked blueberries will last up to a week in the refrigerator but their flavor is best when eaten immediately. Store them unwashed in an airtight container until you are ready to use them. Blueberries can be frozen quite easily - wash and dry them and then pack them into airtight containers where they will store for several months.

 

Apples can be stored on the counter or in the refrigerator, depending on your preference. They will last longer in the refrigerator but may also lose some of their flavor that way (kind of like a tomato), so make whatever choice is best for you! Apples can be frozen raw and used for smoothies and baked goods later - just chop and core the apples and toss them into a freezer bag.

 

Southern peas - also called field peas, crowder peas, or cowpeas - came to North America during the African Diaspora and now have a long history in traditional southern cooking. Although you are probably familiar with the black eyed pea, other southern pea varieties include purple hull, zipper cream, lady peas, and pink-eyed peas. Southern peas can be shelled from the pods when still fresh or dried (like black eyed peas). Shell and use your southern peas within a week or two or you should blanch and freeze them for later use. For more information on the history and preparation of southern peas, check out this article from The Local Palate.

 

Cucumbers should be stored in the high-humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Wrap them in a cloth inside of a breathable bag/container to keep them fresh longer.

 

Summer squash - including varieties like zucchini, patty pan and yellow crookneck - should be stored unwashed until you are ready to use it. Store your squash in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer of the fridge. Larger squash tend to have larger seeds and are therefore often best used in baked goods like zucchini bread or muffins. Grated raw squash can be stored in an airtight container directly in the freezer and used in chili, soup, and baked goods.

 

Snap beans should be stored unwashed in a breathable container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Although many people chop off both ends of the bean before cooking, only the stem end needs to be removed. The rest of the bean is edible and delicious! Snap beans come in a variety of shapes and colors, but the purple beans often lose their color and turn green when cooked. Beans can be blanched, immersed in ice water, dried, and stored in an airtight container in the freezer if necessary. They will lose their crisp texture but retain their flavor when stored this way.

 

Sugar snap peas should be stored unwashed in a breathable container in the refrigerator and eaten within a few days for the best taste. Sugar snap peas are great eaten raw as a snack or chopped up and added to salads. Most of the peas you receive should be stringless, but its simple enough to remove the strings if you find them to be a little tough and chewy. Snap the ends off of the peas with your fingers and gently pull the stem away from the pod, pulling the string with it. You may also receive snow peas in your share this week. Unsure what variety of pea you’ve brought home with you? Check out this article from The Kitchn which will help you identify and use your peas!

Sweet or bell peppers should be stored in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. If there is a lot of condensation on the inside of the bag your peppers arrived in, let your peppers air out or transfer them to another container before putting them in the fridge. Extra condensation will cause your peppers to mold prematurely. Whole peppers will last up to two weeks in ideal conditions; cut peppers will store for several days. Slice, blanch and freeze peppers to keep them for longer. Peppers will lose their crunch in the freezer but are still great for cooked recipes.

 

Hot peppers should be stored just like other peppers, in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Slice, blanch and freeze peppers to keep them for longer. Peppers will lose their crunch in the freezer but are still great for cooked recipes. Each of our farms grow several different varieties of hot peppers, so feel free to check out this pepper identification cheat sheet from Chowhound if you are unsure what peppers you have brought home in your share.

 

Poblano peppers should be stored just like other peppers, in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Slice, blanch, and freeze peppers to keep them for longer. Peppers will lose their crunch in the freezer but are still great for cooked recipes. Poblanos run from mild to medium-hot depending on the pepper.

 

Ripe melons should be stored in the refrigerator. Whole melons should last up to one week while cut melons should be used up within a few days. Wrap your cut melon before placing it in the refrigerator for optimal storage. It can be tricky to tell when melons (watermelons in particular) are ripe. If we accidentally sent you home with an unripe melon, let us know and we will replace it!

Sun Jewel melons are oblong, yellowish-white melons that hail from Asia. Sun Jewel is technically a sweet melon, but in parts of Asia it is often treated more like its cousin the cucumber, as in savory dishes and pickling applications. The flesh is mildly sweet, crispy and almost savory. Some find the flavor to be more vegetal than fruity and it makes the perfect addition to a green salad. Just like you would with any other melon, eat the flesh on the inside and discard the rind. You’ll know your Sun Jewel is ripe and ready to eat when it starts to smell fragrant even when uncut - leave it out of the fridge for a few hours before using the smell test as the fridge tends to dull the smell. Ripe melons should be stored in the refrigerator. Whole melons should last up to one week while cut melons should be used up within a few days. Wrap your cut melon before placing it in the refrigerator for optimal storage.

 

Shishito peppers are an mild, east Asian variety great for frying, roasting, and sauteing. Store your peppers in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator and they should last up to a week. Looking for a super simple way to try these peppers? Fry them up with this recipe from Epicurious!

 

Eggplant should be stored in a breathable container in the low humidity drawer of the refrigerator for up to a week. If your eggplant tends to end up soggy and bitter once cooked, try salting the eggplant slices before cooking to remove some of the excess liquid! Only cut the eggplant when you are ready to use it in a recipe as it can brown quickly. Cut away any brown or soft spots, and the rest of the eggplant is ready to be used. Eggplant can be grilled or added to curries in addition to being used in eggplant parmesan.

 

Okra should be stored in a breathable container in the low humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Use your okra within the week for the best flavor. Okra is delicious stewed, sauteed, stir-fried and even pickled.

 

Store your sweet corn in the husk until you are ready to eat it. Corn should last several days in the refrigerator, but eat it up quickly  because the longer you wait the more time the sugars have to turn into starch, leaving you with less sweet corn. Leftover corn cobs make a great addition to homemade vegetable stock, and corn can also be frozen on or off the cob for later use. You will notice that each cob has had the tip cut off - this practice is standard for the CSA so that you don't end up with any unwelcome guests in your corn. Organic and naturally grown corn cobs are known for being susceptible to corn earworms (it is extremely difficult to avoid them without using insecticides and other sprays), but you can rest assured that the corn you receive in the CSA - regardless of whether it harbored a corn earworm or not before being tipped - is completely safe to eat. Check out this article from The Kitchn for more details.

 

Cherry tomatoes should be stored at room temperature and eaten fairly quickly. We harvest our tomatoes when they are ripe and, while that increases their flavor, it decreases their shelf-life. Refrigeration can cause a loss of sweetness and texture but will add a few days of life to cherry tomatoes nearing over-ripe. Cherry tomatoes are delicious eaten fresh but also make a slightly sweeter sauce if you roast or cook them.

 

Slicing tomatoes should be stored at room temperature and eaten fairly quickly. We harvest our tomatoes when they are ripe and, while that increases their flavor, it decreases their shelf-life. Refrigeration can cause a loss of sweetness and texture but will add a few days of life to tomatoes nearing over-ripe. Tomatoes are delicious additions to sandwiches, soups, sauces, and so much more!

 

Peanuts can be shelled and eaten raw, roasted, or boiled. Raw peanuts have a milder flavor and won't be as crunchy as the roasted peanuts you may be familiar with. The peanuts you receive in your share this week will be raw and in shell. Raw, roasted, and boiled peanuts make a delicious snack!

Greens - Salad

Salad greens - like spinach, lettuce, spicy salad mix, and arugula - should be stored with a damp cloth or paper towel in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Wilted greens can be soaked in ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to perk them up.

 

Tatsoi is an Asian green known for its mild, peppery flavor which is often used to spice up salad mixes or used in place of spinach. You may already be familiar with tatsoi without even realizing it - this green is often included in our spicy salad mix! Tatsoi can be used raw or lightly cooked (just replace spinach with tatsoi in any recipe). Tatsoi should be stored with a damp cloth or paper towel in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. Wilted greens can be soaked in ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to perk them up. Want to know more about this fun and yummy green? Check out this article from Food52.

 

Hearty greens - like kale, collards, cabbage, bok choy and more - should be stored unwashed in an airtight container in the high-humidity drawer of the fridge. Wrap them loosely in a damp cloth to keep them fresh longer. When hearty greens begin to wilt, soak them in a bowl of ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to restore their crispness. To freeze, blanch the greens, immerse in ice water, drain, dry and store in an airtight container in the freezer.

Pea shoots and microgreens are tiny, edible greens that are often found used as garnish in fine dining restaurants, however, this is not their only use! Microgreens are larger and more developed than sprouts but are smaller than "baby" greens (think baby spinach). Pea shoots are similar to microgreens in that you are eating the first few inches of leaves and tendrils from the plant just after it sprouts. Microgreens and pea shoots are both wonderful used fresh (raw) in salads and on sandwiches and also make good additions to cooked meals like grilled cheese, omelettes, and even pizza. Looking for more ideas on how to use them? Check out these additional articles on pea shoots and microgreens - be creative! Store these wrapped in a damp rag or paper towel in a sealed container in the high humidity drawer of the fridge. Neither microgreens nor pea shoots have a long shelf life, so store them well and use them up quickly!

 

Spicy salad mix is a mix of slightly spicier salad greens like mustard, kale and tatsoi. When harvested small, this mix is perfect for eating fresh in a salad. When the leaves get larger, these hearty greens are great for sautees and other cooked recipes! Spicy salad mix should be stored unwashed in an airtight container in the high-humidity drawer of the fridge. Soak wilted greens in a bowl of ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to restore their crispness.

 

Herbs - like rosemary, parsley, cilantro, dill, mint, sage and thyme - should be stored in the fridge. Wrap your herbs loosely in a cloth or paper towel and keep in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer of the fridge. Fresh herbs can be frozen or preserved in oil to extend their shelf life.

 

Basil is sensitive to cold and will brown quickly in the refrigerator. Your best bet is to store it in a jar of water like a bouquet of flowers on the counter out of direct sunlight. Use it up quickly in salads, sauces, and pasta dishes or preserve it for use later in the season. Fresh basil can be frozen or preserved in oil to extend its shelf life.

 

Greens - Hearty

 

Hearty greens like broccoli greens and cauliflower greens should be stored unwashed in an airtight  container in the high-humidity drawer of the fridge. Because broccoli, cauliflower, and collards are so closely related, both broccoli and cauliflower greens can be used in place of collards in recipes. Broccoli greens tend to have more curled edges and a darker color than collards while cauliflower greens tend to be slightly lighter in color and a little more elongated in shape. Wrap them loosely in a damp cloth to keep them fresh longer. When hearty greens begin to wilt, soak them in a bowl of ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to restore their crispness. To freeze, blanch the greens, immerse in ice water, drain, dry and store in an airtight container in the freezer.

 

Broccoli raab (or rabe) is a member of the brassica family along with broccoli, turnips, kale and many other more familiar vegetables. Broccoli raab forms small heads not unlike broccoli, and the leaves, stems and buds are all edible. Store broccoli raab just like you would a head of broccoli. Do not wash until ready to use and store it in the refrigerator in an airtight bag in the high humidity drawer.

 

Store chard like you would lettuce and other salad greens even though you’ll cook it more like a hearty green than anything else. Store in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator with a damp cloth or paper towel. Wilted greens can be soaked in ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to perk them up, although using wilted chard will work just fine too in most cooked recipes! Chard is a close relation to spinach and beets - enjoy chard in any recipe in which you would normally use cooked spinach or beet greens.

 

Store mustard greens like you would lettuce and other salad greens even though you'll cook them more like hearty greens than anything else! If you’ve never cooked them before and are a little intimidated by this spicy green, this article from The Kitchn may give you a good starting point for using this green in recipes! Store in an airtight container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator with a damp cloth or paper towel. Wilted greens can be soaked in ice water for 5 to 10 minutes to perk them up, although using wilted mustard greens will work just fine in any cooked recipe.

 

Napa cabbage is another hearty green and should be stored as such. Napa is wonderful both raw and cooked, and you can use it in place of regular cabbage in most recipes. Sometimes called 'chinese cabbage,' Napa shows up in plenty of Asian dishes. For more information on cooking with Napa, check out this article from Food52. Store your napa cabbage in an airtight container as best you can - sometimes the large size makes it difficult to fit in a plastic bag.

 

Cauliflower should be stored unwashed in a breathable container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. The green leaves at the base of the head are also edible and can be used much like collard greens or broccoli greens. Cauliflower can be chopped raw and eaten with various dips but is also delicious cooked in a variety of ways.

 

Broccoli should be stored unwashed in a breathable container in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator. The stem and leaves at the base of the head are also edible and can be chopped up and eaten just like the rest of the broccoli.

 

Kohlrabi is a curious-looking relation of broccoli and cabbage, and the taste and texture is similar to that of the broccoli stem or cabbage heart. Both the bulb and the leaves of kohlrabi are edible raw or cooked. Store kohlrabi in the refrigerator like you would a head of broccoli, in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer. The leaves of kohlrabi will last longer if stored separately from the bulb. The leaves can be prepared like you would prepare collards or mustard greens although they tend to be a little tougher than collards. The bulb should be peeled before using, especially if you plan on eating it raw. If you are feeling overwhelmed by this bizarre looking vegetable, this article from The Kitchn may help you find your way!

 

Roots

Dried beans are very easy to store - just keep them like you would other dried beans! To cook the beans, soak them in cool water for at least 3 hours. Drain and rinse the beans, then fill up a pot with water until the beans are covered by about an inch of water. Bring the pot to a gentle boil and simmer for an hour and a half or until the beans are tender. If you don't have a lot of experience cooking with dried beans, take a look at this great article from Bon Appetit for some inspiration.

 

The North Georgia Candy Roaster squash is an heirloom variety native to the southeast. The smooth, orange flesh is perfect for baking, roasting and for pie filling. These squash will store for several months without much attention, although they do prefer a cooler environment than your room temperature kitchen. To store for longer, cook the squash until soft, remove the rind and mash. After the squash mash has cooled, place it in an airtight container and freeze it. For more info on this awesome squash, check out this article from Slow Food USA. If you’ve never roasted a winter squash before or you just want to know more tips for dealing with large squash like this, check out this fantastic article from Self Proclaimed Foodie for more information!

 

Butternut squash will store for several months without much attention, although they do prefer a cooler environment than your room temperature kitchen. Make sure to store them in a dark, dry and well-ventilated space for optimum storage. To keep for longer, cook the squash until soft, remove the rind and mash. After the squash mash has cooled, place it in an airtight container and freeze it. If you are a little overwhelmed by the prospect of chopping that squash open and cooking it, take a look at this inspirational article from Self Proclaimed Foodie to get you started.

 

Winter squash - including buttercup, acorn, delicata, and butternut - will store for several months without much attention, although they should be stored in a cooler environment than your room temperature kitchen if possible. Make sure to store winter squash in a dark, dry, and well-ventilated space for optimum storage. To keep for longer, cook the squash until soft, remove the rind and mash. After the squash mas has cooled, place it in an airtight container and freeze it. Not sure what type of winter squash you received in your share this week? Take a look at this  winter squash identification guide from The Spruce to find out more about your squash!

 

Spaghetti squash will store for several months without much attention, although they do prefer a cooler environment than your room temperature kitchen. Make sure to store them in a dark, dry, and well-ventilated space for optimum storage. To keep for longer, cook the squash until soft, remove the rind and seeds, and mash. After the squash mash has cooler, place it in an airtight container and freeze it. Spaghetti squash is so named because after you bake it like you would other winter squash and go to scrape the soft flesh out of the rind, you'll end up with strands of squash similar to spaghetti. Never cooked a spaghetti squash before? Take a look at this simple, step by step recipe from The Kitchn to guide your squash adventure!

 

Store your sweet potatoes unwashed in a cool, dark, dry and ventilated space. They will store best between 55 and 60 degrees F. To store for longer, bake them in the oven until they are not quite done and wrap them in tin foil before putting them in the freezer. Finish cooking them when you remove them from the freezer. Don't forget that those sweet potato skins are also edible and full of awesome nutrients!

 

Store your potatoes unwashed in a dark, cool, well-ventilated place. Make sure to store your potatoes away from your onions as storing them close together will cause your potatoes to sprout sooner. Slightly soft potatoes are still safe to eat, but make to toss any that have started to turn green. If your potato starts to sprout eyes, pop the eyes off with your finger and use the potato up quickly!

 

Both the roots and the greens of radishes are edible. Separate the green tops from the roots and store separately to keep them fresh longer. Store both in the high humidity drawer of the fridge, but store the greens in an airtight container and the roots in a breathable container. Use the greens up quickly as they are prone to wilt while the roots will last up to two weeks in ideal conditions. The roots are wonderful sliced raw on salads or in slaw or even roasted in the oven with other root vegetables. The radish greens tend to be a little fuzzy when raw, and are therefore best served cooked - either lightly sauteed or braised!

 

A watermelon radish is a  winter radish named for its color - greenish white on the outside and bright reddish pink on the inside. Watermelon radishes are larger than your average salad radishes and range in size from that of a golf ball to that of a softball. They tend to be fairly mild in flavor and are both slightly peppery and slightly sweet. Store your watermelon radishes like you would other radishes by dividing the roots from the greens. Store both in the high humidity drawer of the fridge, but store the greens in an airtight container and the roots in a breathable container. Use the greens up quickly as they are prone to wilt while the roots will last up to two weeks in ideal conditions.

 

A daikon radish is a mild flavored winter radish that can look more like a white or purple carrot than the salad radishes you may be familiar with. Separate the green tops from the roots and store separately to keep them fresh longer. Store both in the high humidity drawer of the fridge, but store the greens in an airtight container and the roots in a breathable container. Use the greens up quickly as they are prone to wilt while the roots will last up to two weeks in ideal conditions. Feel free to use your daikon radish in place of the more familiar salad radishes, or check out this article from The Kitchn for more ideas!

 

Both the roots and the greens of turnips are edible. Separate the green tops from the roots and store separately to keep them fresh longer. Store both in the high humidity drawer of the refrigerator, but store the greens in an airtight container and the roots in a breathable container. Use the greens up quickly as they are prone to wilt while the roots will last up to two weeks in ideal conditions. The roots are wonderful sliced raw on salads or roasted in the oven with other root vegetables.

 

Store your rutabagas like other root crops - put them in the high humidity drawer of your refrigerator in a breathable container. Rutabagas are related to turnips and cabbage and have a flavor that is a mix of both vegetables. Don't be intimidated by your rutabaga! This solid crop is great roasted and mashed with or without some of your other favorite root crops. If you're not sure how to approach your first rutabaga, take a look at this article from The Kitchn to get you started.

 

Store sunchokes as you would other root crops - in the low-humidity drawer of your refrigerator. Wrap sunchokes in a towel and place in an airtight container as they tend to mold when there is too much moisture in the fridge. Sunchokes - also known as Jerusalem Artichokes - are a great potato substitute and taste like a cross between a mild artichoke and a potato. Want to know more about this curious little tuber? Check out this article from The Spruce.

 

Fresh ginger should be stored in the refrigerator in an airtight container. Ginger does not necessarily need to be peeled before using. Feel free to skip peeling if the skin is very fine - just give it a good scrub first to remove any dirt. Fresh ginger has a slightly different taste than the ginger you find in the grocery store - it tends to have some sweetness in addition to the spiciness you may be familiar with. Fresh ginger will not last as long as the store bought version since its skin is much thinner. To keep your ginger for longer, store it whole and frozen in an airtight container. It will retain its flavor but tends to go mushy and is best used in cooked dishes once frozen.

 

Carrots and their leafy green tops are both edible. Separate the tops from the roots. Store the unwashed carrots in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer of the fridge; store the greens in an airtight container. Perk up limp carrots by leaving them in an ice bath for an hour or use them up in soups and stews.

 

Store beets much like you would carrots, by separating the roots from the greens. Store the beets in a breathable bag in the high humidity drawer of the fridge, and store the greens in an airtight container. The greens can be used much like chard. Unsure about what to do with your beets? Try peeling and chopping the beets, tossing them in olive oil, and roasting them with any other root vegetables you happen to have lying around!

 

Store your fennel like you would carrots - dividing the bulb from the stems and storing them separately in the fridge. The bulb, stems and feathery fronds are all edible. Although fennel is known for its licorice flavor, the flavor can be toned down by roasting the fennel (which can also bring out its sweetness). Not sure what to do with the fennel you’ve received in your share? Check out some creative fennel ideas in this article from Food52.